I was not one of the many who were bowled over by the slow, curveball charms of Napoleon Dynamite. Sure, Napoleon Dynamite was fun and quotable and had a certain lunatic bravery to it. But Napoleon Dynamite was also plotless and meandering, and had a little of that back-and-to-the-left feel to it --  as if it was looking down on its characters, as opposed to looking out through them. The nice thing about mixed and incendiary indie debuts is that they usually lead to subsequent films, where you get a sense of if the director/writer/star has, in fact, more than one movie in them. So it is with Nacho Libre, the second film from Napoleon Dynamite's director and co-writer Jared Hess. Hess is back behind the helm here, and this time around he and regular co-writer (and wife) Jerusha Hess even have the benefit of a script polish by Mike White (Chuck and Buck, School of Rock) for their film. Is Nacho Libre a worthy follow-up to Napoleon Dynamite? Well, part of answering that question involves how worthy you think Napoleon Dynamite is in the first place. ...

Jack Black stars as the kindly, dim and warmhearted Ignacio, a monk-in-training at an abbey/orphanage in rural Mexico. Ignacio makes meals for the orphans out of scraps, and is pretty much low man on the abbey's totem pole in terms of duties: He doesn't even rate conversation time with the new cute nun, Sister Encarnación (Ana de la Reguar). Ignacio has but one dream: To be a luchador, a masked wrestler. And once it dawns on him that he can wrestle and use the money to buy the orphans better food, well, bring on the tights. ...
categories Reviews, Cinematical