I was pretty impressed with director John Levine's debut film, the retro-slasher horror throwback known as All the Boys Love Mandy Lane, and so logically I was looking forward to the filmmaker's follow-up project. Unfortunately, Mr. Levine chose to not only direct his sophomore effort, but write it too. And that's where most of the problems start. Based only on his first two films, it's pretty clear that Levine has a gift for the visual side of the equation -- but as far as the writing goes...

The Wackness (yes, that's the actual title, and wait till you hear the actual dialog that inspired the title) feels like something that was written by a bored 17-year-old during one lazy afternoon in detention. And while it's safe to assume that much of The Wackness is based on Levine's own experiences, the potential realism is consistently undone by the writer's affection for cliche, stereotype, and completely unrealistic behavior. A potentially poignant moment is followed by a really obvious drug gag, which is then followed by some small chunk of speech-making that never once sounds like something a human would say.