Tennessee Williams is arguably one of the greatest American playwrights, and the film adaptations of his plays have become classics in their own right: The Glass Menagerie, Baby Doll, The Rose Tattoo, Cat on a Hot Tin Roof, and of course, A Streetcar Named Desire. The Loss of a Teardrop Diamond is one of the few, if only, plays Williams wrote specifically for film. Williams discussed the project in an interview with the New York Times in 1957, and Elia Kazan, the director of Baby Doll and A Streetcar Named Desire, was supposedly attached to direct. It's unclear now if Kazan was ever officially involved; the director instead went on to film Wild River and Diamond has gathered dust until now.

Bryce Dallas Howard stars as the eccentric Fisher Willow, a gorgeous young woman who chafes under the strict rules of her aunt Cornelia (Ann-Margaret) but also wants to make sure she gets her fair share of Cornelia's wealth when the time comes. The Depression is coming, and finances are getting tight, so Fisher is forced to abandon her studies in Europe to return home to Memphis. We're made sure to understand that she's a wild child in the opening scenes where she's the only white woman drinking and dancing at a blues club.