Filmmaker Davis Guggenheim has given us smaller Hollywood flicks like Gossip and Gracie. He has also helmed fantastic episodes of Deadwood and 24, and recently gave us widely different documentaries in The Inconvenient Truth and It Might Get Loud -- but one thing you may notice while scanning across his filmography is that he's pretty fascinated by the American education system. His 2001 documentary The First Day is a passionate and fascinating look at some of L.A.'s most difficult schools, and his latest film, Waiting for Superman, takes an even wider look at how we in America educate our children.

Or, more specifically, how we've generally failed to educate our children.

Equal parts sickening, fascinating, and inspiring, 'Waiting for 'Superman'' (the title refers to a child's dream of being rescued) takes firm aim at our national education system and asks a few simple but angry questions. Like, for example, how can one of the richest and most privileged countries in the world fail so resoundingly at educating its youngest generations? How long must our system fracture before someone comes up with a plan that actually works? Why do so many politicians promise education reforms ... but practically never follow through? And, perhaps most importantly, what can a dedicated parent actually DO to help ensure their kids a legitimate and high-quality education?