Where the Wild Things Are
Spike Jonze's ambitious feature, based on the Maurice Sendak classic, led Todd Gilchrist to write: "Where the Wild Things Are is most effective because it faithfully recreates the dimensions of childhood experience, but it filters them through the realities of adulthood. As an understated work of spectacle, or maybe a spectacular work of understatement, Jonze's latest film is not only his best to date, but a monstrous achievement in its own right - with or without the big furry creatures." Buy it.

The Blu-ray disc includes a bonus film: the too-adorable and super-cute adaptation of Sendak's Higgelty Pigglety Pop! -- the latest short from Madame Tutli-Putli filmmakers Chris Lavis and Maciek Szczerbowski. Meryl Streep voices a dog who leaves her master to find a new life and become a star for the World Mother Goose Theater. (Spike Jonze and Forest Whitaker also lend their voices.)

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2012
That old Mayan prophecy finally gets realized, at least on the big screen, with Roland Emmerich's apocalyptic thriller. In his review, Peter Hall wrote: "what some fail to understand is that even with the brain turned off, even with disbelief firmly suspended, some movies stink so ferociously that the stench wafts off of the screen, snapping even the most resistant critic to full alertness like a slap in the face by a glove spiked with smelling salts. 2012 is not immune to analysis simply because it is an openly absurd movie." Skip it.

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