Cinematical's Indie Roundup: 'Kaboom,' 'Rubber,' 'Poetry'

Indie Roundup is your weekly guide to what's new and upcoming in the world of independent film. Pictured above, clockwise from upper left
: Kaboom, Rubber, Poetry.

Deals. A flurry of deals were sealed at Cannes, according to indieWIRE. Topping the list, by dint of its Best Screenplay Award at the Cannes Film Festival, is Lee Chang-dong's Poetry; Kino International made the acquisition. The Korean-language drama follows a 60-something grandmother as she takes a writing course to help her deal with the onset of senility, according to a review by Eric Kohn.

At the opposite side of the artistic spectrum lies Quentin Dupieux's Rubber, which has been picked up by Magnet Releasing. The film "stars" a tire named Robert. "For those who thrive on the willfully absurd, Dupieux's creation will be an instant hit," wrote Todd Brown at Twitch." For those whose tolerance is lower, however, the joke will likely run thin will before the run time comes to an end." Our own Joe Utichi clearly 'thrives on the willfully absurd,' writing: "It all comes together to deliver a film brimming with comic brilliance and manic originality."

On the more "traditional" front, if indie icon Gregg Araki can ever be described as "traditional," his latest film, Kaboom, starring Thomas Dekker, has been acquired by IFC Films. Once again, we turn to our man in Cannes, Joe Utichi, who noted: "Funny, sexy and mad, Kaboom may not be vintage Araki, but it's more than worth watching "

Other acquisitions include Xavier Beauvois' monks and Muslims drama Of Gods and Men, grabbed by Sony Pictures Classics.

After the jump: the state of Asian film festivals in the United States. Plus, SilverDocs announces its lineup.
categories Movies, Cinematical