Hot on the heels of my mixed and frustrated (and painstakingly spoiler-light) review of 'Never Let Me Go' (directed by Mark Romanek and starring Keira Knightley, Andrew Garfield and Carey Mulligan), I had the opportunity for a telephone chat with the film's writer, Alex Garland.

Garland initially made waves with his novel 'The Beach,' (get it? waves? 'The Beach'? Pulitzers have been awarded for less), and the script he provided for Danny Boyle's adaptation would mark the beginnings of a mutually grand collaboration. The British scribe would go on to write Boyle's masterpiece of a zombie-riff ('28 Days Later') as well as 'Sunshine,' a troubled space mission flick as aesthetically rigorous as it was deeply affecting. With 'Never Let Me Go,' Garland is trying his hand at something new, stepping out from Boyle's increasingly out-sized shadow to his first adaptation of another author's novel (in this case, Garland's Booker Prize-winning friend, Kazuo Ishiguro).

Garland was taking a breather from the Toronto International Film Festival grind in his Toronto hotel room, and he was extremely candid and forthcoming about both his writing process and his career in general. Garland made it quite evident that he maintains complete command over the choices he makes, and is fully aware of how his decisions impact a script as a whole. So follow the jump for a conversation (with spoilers) that touches upon atheism, re-shoots, teenage sex and everything in between.
categories Interviews, Cinematical