As revered as Alfred Hitchcock deservedly remains among critics, as much as he is an embodiment of studio-system auteurism, some of his movies just aren't that good. Or rather, they may not be as good as they are influential. Hitchcock's influence on modern suspense and horror is undeniable, and yet there are several of his films – particularly a few of his last – that simply don't have the same cache of greatness as his earlier triumphs, either because they weren't conceived with the imagination and passion of his most celebrated classics, or they repeated the techniques of their predecessors to significantly lesser effect.

'Psycho' was released in 1960 to a hailstorm of controversy, which followed the already vociferous controversy of the film's production. Suffice it to say that the film has gone on to become one of Hitchcock's signature works, not to mention a benchmark box office success both in terms of its public promotion and the money that campaign generated. But is Hitchcock's 'Psycho' still as terrifying as on the first day it drew back the shower curtain on audiences?