You probably won't find all that many people who rank 1951's 'Alice in Wonderland' among the finest efforts of the studio's "Golden Age." That's not to say it's a bad film (it definitely is not), but among the old-school classics (like 'Snow White,' 'Sleeping Beauty,' and 'Cinderella') 'Alice' stands out as a wildly plotless and anarchic piece of storytelling -- which means it fits Lewis Carroll's source material to a tee -- that's beautiful to look at (and listen to), but it seems to lack the essential "heart" that many of the Disney greats have in spades.

Having said that, 'Alice in Wonderland' (1951) is still a true-blue classic in the pantheon of Disney Feature Animation, and the studio has done right by the film by delivering a fantastic two-disc "60th Anniversary Edition" blu-ray. The film has never looked lovelier, which helps an animation buff to appreciate what's so great about the film, and that's the look of it.

As you're no doubt well aware, Carroll's 'Alice in Wonderland' is about a young girl who tumbles into a rabbit hole and encounters all sorts of bizarre creatures on her long trek back to reality. That's pretty much it, really, and it's this loosy-goosey "nonsense" style that made Carroll such a hit in his day. Grown-ups of all varieties (psychologists, literary experts, filmmakers) have tried to decipher the weirdness of 'Wonderland,' but that's missing the point: to children, nonsensical adventures are food for the soul.