Normally I approach "fan-made" remixes (be they audio, textual, or visual) with a grain of salt, a little charity, and a general sense of disinterest. But it took me less than ten minutes of Fatboy Robert's recent release -- Geek: Remixed III -- before I realized how impressive this stuff was. My first exposure to his music was via the excellent Portland cartoonist / film critic / bon vivant Mike Russell. My reaction? "I love this Mario Bros. track because it's not ironic."

Mr. Roberts was truly enjoying the goofy little Mario ditty, and he wanted to make it sound a little, well, funkier. But then he approached movie music masters like John Williams, Ennio Morricone, and Jerry Goldsmith with the same amount of respect; Fatboy's additions actively complement the already-excellent music that we know and love. This is not an over-caffeinated kid who is blaring noises over the 'Jaws' theme, but a sincere movie-lover who also has a real gift for bad-ass beats.

So I told the guy we should chat. And we did. (Be sure to play some of the YouTube (audio only) tracks as you read the interview! Like this one right here!)

Harsh critics call this stuff plagiarism. Loyal fans call it a new angle on some great music. What's your take?

It's a nostalgia bath, really. Auditory comfort food. At least, that's how I always looked at it. Both from the perspective of the stuff I'm sampling and the way I'm interpreting it: I'm taking the music of my nerdy formative years, and combining it with the sort of hip-hop production they stopped doing right around 1997, right before sample laws got really harsh and people started making beats that sounded like they were learning on a Casio made out of Tupperware. I can see the plagiarism argument: I'm essentially taking some genius from John Williams / Jerry Goldsmith / Danny Elfman, taking a razor blade to it and then throwing a sack of breakbeats at it. It's not entirely original. But "originality" and "pop music" don't necessarily go hand in hand anyway. Ask Robert Johnson and Muddy Waters what they think about Led Zeppelin's existence, you'd probably get a different answer than the one Robert Plant would give you.
categories Interviews, Cinematical