Welcome to Framed, a Cinematical column that runs every Thursday and celebrates the artistry of cinema -- one frame at a time.

Short films have come a long way since the moving images of stag cinema, exotic locales, fairground variety acts, propaganda and the marvels of everyday life. What has grown since the days of Edison's Kinetoscope and the Lumière Cinématographe has developed out of an artist's view of the world -- like the Surrealist experiments of the twenties ('Un Chien Andalou') and the sixties avant-garde (Chris Marker). In the eighties, another kind of short film was born -- the music video ('Thriller'). MTV showcased the work of directors -- many of whom eventually became feature film favorites (David Fincher) -- whose quick-cut editing style influenced the way we consume visual narrative. Now, with the advent of newer technology and the Internet, an independent/DIY aesthetic has become more widely accepted, and short films have been easier to view and distribute.

Filmmakers like Tzang Merwyn Tong have benefited from the short film's continuing evolution. He turned heads at 2003's WorldFest in Houston with his debut movie, 'e'Tzaintes,' when he was only 19-years-old and had no prior filmmaking experience. After winning audiences over at the Rotterdam and Singapore International Film Festivals and Montreal's FanTasia with his 2005 movie, 'A Wicked Tale,' he became the youngest Singaporean to release a film commercially on DVD.
categories Columns, Cinematical