Grizzly Man is the story of what happens when a desperate, mentally unstable person decides to stop taking his meds and commit suicide in a very unique way: by taunting grizzly bears.

As the film starts we are introduced to a quirky, but seemingly sane animal researcher and environmentalist, Timothy Treadwell. He sits in the foreground of the beautiful Alaskan wilderness as huge grizzle bears slowly meander through their daily lives. You get the sense that he is a little too close to the bears, but since he's an expert who's lived amongst the grizzly bears in Alaska for 13 seasons you figure he knows what he's doing.

German director Werner Herzog quickly fills us in on exactly how close Treadwell does get to the bears (he touches them on the nose while holding his video camera in the other hand), and how exactly dangerous this behavior is (grizzly bears, when hungry enough, are known to hunt and eat humans).

As Treadwell goes on and on talking about how much he loves, loves, loves (really loves!!!) these animals in a frenetic and oddly effeminate way, you realize that this is not a stable person hamming it up for the camera.

Twenty minutes into the film you realize that Treadwell might as well be jumping into an ocean filled with great white sharks—there is no way he's going to survive, even if he has done this for 13 years without a scratch. In a spell of obvious foreshadowing David Letterman asks Treadwell if we're going to open up the paper someday and find out if he was killed by the bears. Well, duh?!?!

categories Cinematical