It's Summer Movie Week over at Slate. That means David Edelstein and friends have temporarily "set aside Truffaut, Clouzot, and Almodóvar" (although, to be fair, the work of Henri-Georges Clouzot is not a matter dealt with daily by Slate or anyone else) in order to focus on superstars, superheroes and supergrosses. Today's installment is specifically concerned with two superauteurs - George Lucas and Steven Speilberg.

First, Tom Shone deconstructs long-running sort-of rivalry, which he describes as "something more like the impacted, covert, passive-aggressive version of rivalry practiced by siblings—wherein any hint of hostility is buried in a bear hug and conflict covered with a smile." Then, Edelstein sends an email to friend/Wall Street Journal critic Joe Morgenstern, in effort to jumpstart a conversation on the place of the blockbuster in movie history. "For the most part," Edelstein writes, "I cherish the '70s but can hardly blame Spielberg or Lucas for capturing the imaginations of vast numbers of people." Morgenstern doesn't officially reply until tomorrow, but imagine he'll tell Dave exactly where to put his blame...