• Brokeback Mountain continues to expand into small markets, gaining slowly but surely in suburban and rural areas whilst its big-city box office starts to lose its lustre. Focus' strategy on this one seems to be working beautifully: Oscar buzz keeps getting louder as the picture, slowly but surely, rolls out wider, making for non-existant overall drop-offs even as the film runs out of first-time viewers in urban markets. In other specialty box office news: Cache is doing surprisingly well for a foreign offering, and Match Point is in line to break Woody Allen's previous box office records.
  • Warner Home Video is jumping into the Latino home entertainment market in a big way. They've created a new venture that will market Spanish language titles to US consumers,meaning only good things for the new wave of independent, South American filmmakers. It's an incredibly low-overhead gambit with tons of potential – the Spanish-language home video market has grown 83% in the past two years.
  • Elizabeth Guider looks into the bubbling controversy over studio exec paychecks, which, she writes, "like that of their confreres across all U.S. business sectors ... is rising disproportionately to that of their employees." The SEC's big problem in pursuing this, she says, is that the Hollywood's tendency to ascribe value to nebulous qualities such as star power make improprieties hard to guage. "Who's going to say Leslie Moonves, Peter Cherninand others of their stature aren't as valuable properties as Tom Cruise or Tom Hanks?"