It's often very easy to not question authority, because we're often completely unaware that there's even an authority to question. Kirby Dick's documentary This Film is Not Yet Ratedtakes one of the film industry's most sacrosanct, secret processes – the ratings-assignment methodology of the Motion Picture Association of America – and dissects it with a steady hand and a twinkle in his eye.
Dick's working several angles here, and all of them worth exploring: First up is the contention that the MPAA is essentially tougher on independent films than those from major studios; second is the thesis that the MPAA is more afraid of – and therefore more strict about – female and homosexual sexuality than it is about male gratification; third is the suggestion that the MPAA is not an impartial body, but rather works to help the ever-dwindling number of major studios gain more and more of a stranglehold on the culture by damaging the financial and artistic prospects of independent film; and, finally, that the fact the MPAA's raters and processes are secret is a violation of the essential right to face people who are, in effect, your accusers.  ...

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