There are films you want to like, but don't. The opposite is even more rare: Films you don't want to like, but do. The Darwin Awards, the new film by Finn Taylor, is one of the latter. It's episodic, scattershot, uneven and lurches about in the most ungainly fashion imaginable … but at the same time, there are flashes of weird, off-kilter humor in it. Put bluntly? It's a train wreck, but there are some interesting bits and pieces in the wreckage. …

San Francisco Police Department homicide profile Joseph Fiennes has a steady eye and a jumpy stomach. He can look at a crime scene and find amazing clues that lead to the killer … but the sight of blood makes him faint. His mixture of genius and tics mean that he catches – and then loses – the North Beach Killer, and with a student documentary filmmaker trailing his every move, the embarrassing flub is public knowledge. Washed-up, thrown off the force and depressed, he retreats into his obsession: The internet-spread, quasi-urban legends known as The Darwin Awards, people who commit errors in judgment so severe they're removed from the gene pool by them permanently. Fiennes has the idea to take his research into the private sector – by finding Darwin contenders both pre- and post-mortem and using that understanding to save money for a large insurance company.

(More after the jump. ...)