• The Adventures Of Mark Twain - Before "Claymation" became a generic term to describe stop-motion clay animation, it was the invention of Will Vinton, known to most as "The California Raisins Guy". However, this long lost 1985 feature, rooted in the stories of Mark Twain, is his greatest accomplishment. The painstaking, frame-by-frame giving of form and life to lumps of Plasticine may to some be a quaint reminder of how things used to be done before computers gave access to those of all skill levels, but Vinton masters both the crafts of animation and, with the help of screenwriter (and wife) Susan Shadburne, storytelling. Twain's imaginative tales are a perfect vehicle for Vinton, too, and James Whitmore's characterization of the wizened statesman is a perfect magnifying glass. Most memorable (and disturbing) is "The Mysterious Stranger", in which Tom, Huck and Becky get a lesson in human nature from the Devil himself. In 2002, Vinton was ousted from the studio he founded by majority shareholder Phil Knight (of Nike), and formed Laika Entertainment House in 2005, which was tapped to give life to Neil Gaiman's Coraline. Now if only they'd release the 41 Vinton-produced episodes of Eddie Murphy's The PJ's.
  • Bubble - Steven Soderbergh's experiment, released simultaneously in theaters, on DVD and PPV. Read Karina's review here.
  • Dune: Extended Edition - David Lynch's ill-fated 1984 adaptation of Frank Herbert's revered sci-fi novel/political drama was cut to a manageable 137 minutes from its original 177, and for years, bootlegs and other unofficial releases were the only way that fans could see what was cut. Last year, however, the extra footage was shown when the film played on Sci-Fi, and Universal has assembled it all for this 2-disc release, which includes both versions. Alas, however, it is without Lynch's participation (the long cut is directed by Alan Smithee), as the best the studio could muster is the OK of producer Raffaella De Laurentiis, who introduces the deleted scenes.