In college, they all knew each other. Four years later, they're starting to wonder if they even know who they are. The soul-searching isn't accidental: Michael (Adam Garcia) and Elise (Amy Adams) are getting married this weekend, and as all their friends gather around, each comes with a custom outfit and individual set of neuroses. Samantha (Melissa Sagemiller) is wondering if Rich (Aaron Stanford) is ever going to pop the question; Jennifer (Lauren German) and Lana (Mena Suvari) are both carrying some emotional baggage from their undergrad days; Quentin (Colin Hanks) has become a slick-haired, slick-talking agent, and Pockets (Jon Abrahams) is hiding a few old wounds behind his devil-may-care grin and mannerisms. And Michael and Elise aren't perfect, either. …

Written by Michael Perniciario and Timm Sharp, Standing Still is a look at that transitional period in life when you're drinking almost as much as you used to in college, but at least now you're doing it out of proper glassware. When I was younger, I loved movies like St. Elmo's Fire, as they offered a fascinating glimpse into a fantasy version of adulthood: Wow, look at Rob Lowe's apartment! As the years progress, though, you learn that, for example, movie apartments are always eight times the size of what real people with those jobs could actually afford (among many, many other things). And in time, those movies turn from fateful prophecy to unintentional comedy. Maybe if I were, like the characters, four years away from my university graduation -- and not 14 -- Standing Still might have had a slightly better effect on me; as it was, I felt like the oldest guy at the party, swilling bourbon while younger people worked through stuff I had (or hadn't) endured a long time ago.
categories Reviews, Cinematical