Ah, the 90s. It was a magical time, when anything seemed possible and the world -- small as it had become -- appeared as wondrous and uncharted as the stars themselves. To be reductive about it (which is obviously the best way to be about all things), the 90s were a modern renaissance during which zest and ambition were all that was needed to stand astride the world. Science and industry had joined hands to profitably conquer our own flaws and failings, and it began to feel as if there was a cure for almost everything. Happiness and erections were suddenly just a pill away, and -- if 'Reality Bites' taught us anything (or if 'Reality Bites' taught us everything) -- "selling out" was the ultimate sin. With that in mind, Ed Zwick's new romantic drama / comedy / parade of breasts 'Love and Other Drugs' isn't a period piece set during the 90s so much as it is the 90s itself, a solipsistic and hugely enjoyable ride that betrays its tremendous promise by playing it safe precisely when it should be trying to change the world.
Love and Other Drugs
R2010
Based on 38 critics

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categories Reviews, Cinematical