72
Based on 8 Critics
64
Based on 50 Users
  • The Affair is subtle, smart and an intelligent examination of the way in which we are all the unreliable narrators of our own lives. Show More

  • Season 2 improves on Season 1 by broadening the story to give us the points of view of the wronged spouses, Noah's wife, Helen (Maura Tierney,) and Alison's husband, Cole (Joshua Jackson.) Tierney and Jackson are both so good, they left us wanting more in Season 1, and it's great to see their characters do some well-justified venting. Show More

  • As was the case with the controversial "In Treatment," those with no patience for self-analysis or a psychologically minded view of relationships may find The Affair slow going. But the mystery element should keep even impatient viewers guessing. Show More

  • It’s a lot to ask, and I worry that the show’s structure will define the program more than the characters within it or the themes explored by it. Having said that, there’s just as much reason for hope that this will be the next great cable drama. Most notably, the cast clicks. Show More

  • Each individual hour of The Affair holds your attention, and perhaps it’s best to just keep watching before deciding whether the overarching narrative is cohering in a satisfying way. Show More

  • Okay, I’ll buy into it for the sake of the wonderful acting being done here. Then too, Jeffrey Reiner’s direction is superb, the rhythm of his framing and the cameras’ points of view underscoring without intruding upon the drama. Show More

  • Getting meta and representing a debate happening outside of the show within it is never a good idea, and it’s one of the many scenes that makes The Affair’s new season exceptionally stuffy at times. Show More

  • Fueled by a bevy of strong central performances led by the always impeccable Dominic West, consistently clever writing, and Marcelo Zarvos’ deft musical accompaniment, The Affair continues to defy expectations with a fervent third outing. Show More

  • That we never really know the people whom we love is a powerful, popular theme that fits snugly into the thriller and horror genres (think of “Rosemary’s Baby” and all those early ’90s erotic thrillers) but to see it rendered so artfully and crisply and unsentimentally as a weekly drama is to understand why we are so often informed that we live in a golden age of TV. Show More

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