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reviews

50
Based on 23 Reviews
critic reviews (10)
fan reviews ( 1 )
  • 100
    Ruthe Stein San Francisco Chronicle

    Among the many strengths of the sweetly touching Introducing the Dwights, a small gem from Australia unearthed at the Sundance Film Festival, is that Jean never becomes Godzilla. show more

  • 63
    Claudia Puig USA Today

    For those seeking an alternative to giant robots and flying wizards, there's an amusing Australian comedy that might be just the right panacea for blockbuster overload. show more

  • 40
    Wall Street Journal

    Jean's material is so flat-out awful it's amazing she gets hired at all, let alone that she once supposedly had headliner potential. It's a discrepancy that Introducing the Dwights never addresses. show more

  • 50
    Jack Mathews New York Daily News

    If you find a movie with a more annoying central performance than the one given by Brenda Blethyn in Cherie Nowlan's Introducing the Dwights, keep it to yourself. show more

  • 75
    James Berardinelli ReelViews

    It does what all good coming of age movies do, and that makes it a worthy and welcome entry into the genre. show more

  • 63
    Peter Debruge Miami Herald

    The dynamic between mother and son is fascinating, with Blethyn creating a character who is more antagonist than villain. show more

  • 63
    Kyle Smith New York Post

    No matter how good Blethyn is at playing up the sweet hurt of a woman who is well on the decline but never made it in the first place, your admiration for her shrieking-and-drinking breakdown scenes is likely to be tested after about the fifth go-round. show more

  • 50
    Chicago Tribune

    The movie successfully balances the sentimental and bittersweet only about half the time. The performances are intelligent and well-crafted, and Blethyn is unmistakably a star performer, attracting attention like a vortex. But she's somewhat miscast here. show more

  • 50
    Liam Lacey The Globe and Mail (Toronto)

    The script's attempt to splice together a fumbling love story with a portrait of toxic personality disorder feels incongruous, like a serving of porridge flambé au whisky. show more

  • 38
    Wesley Morris Boston Globe

    Nothing about this movie works, not the title (it used to be called "Clubland "), not Blethyn's attempt to inject comedy into her rickety stereotype of a character. show more

  • May 22, 2008 cdaklin
    Report This User

    This movie is billed as a comedy. That could not be farther from the truth. I have always liked Brenda Blethyn's acting--have watched her over the years, and so was excited to see this. Really, really awful. The story between Tim and Jill is about as unbelievable as Bush's re-election. It has no credibility: no story, no realness, no reason for a/Tim who at least SEEMS to have some compassion and sense to be attracted to a young woman who clearly has some significant emotional problems (i.e. she bursts into tears when he, a virgin, refuses to have sex with her the first time she intiates it. She takes it as a very real sign that her breasts are too small.), b/Mark, whose incapacity is so unclear the viewer is not sure whether he is mildly retarded,has emotional problems of his own, or has Cerebral Palsy but no mental affliction. He is witty and funny,and almost campy in his portrayal of Mark--how does this figure with someone who supposedly was deprived of oxygen at birth? One never really knows. c/Mom, alcoholic, narcissictic, and who is almost incestuous in her attachment to her sons, but, seemingly lovable despite it all. Through all this is a side story about a neighbor across the street who is dying of breast cancer--certainly sad, but the point of her presence in the story is never made really clear. The ending is a farce, a cloyingly uncomfortable and highly unreasonable metamorphosis of Mom from repugnant to repentant--with total acceptance from all those she has betrayed and hurt in the past. This movie hangs together like so many bits of celluloid strung with duct-tape: a few genuine moments interspersed with great discomfort and distaste from which the viewer can't escape. Yuck.

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