Have you heard? Come April 16, the superhero franchise will be dead thanks to Mark Millar, Matthew Vaughn, and Kick-Ass. It deconstructs everything you know or think about the genre, man. It's violent and edgy, and none of the characters have superpowers. They just wear costumes and act as vigilantes. They're teenagers. They have emotions, and they're not the pristine and pure types you find in Marvel and DC.

Once this movie comes out, everything will change. Everything will end. The Guardian says so: "[Kick-Ass] is a comic-book character so postmodern that he makes all those who came before look like relics of a bygone age. The dreams and visions of comic-book readers and cinemagoers in the 1930s – or 50s and 60s in the case of many of Marvel's characters – are not those of today's audiences, no more than the 60s version of James Bond, with his misogyny, preposterous gadgets and cheeky one-liners, is suitable for a spy thriller in the new millennium. Something fresh and new is required."

Graeme McMillan also predicted such a thing in February: "It'll also skew the superhero movies that follow, drawing attention to their more formulaic moments and poking fun at the lack of self-conscious humor whenever they're played straight (Iron Man 2, already approaching self-parody in its trailer, is probably safe from this, but what about Thor? Or Captain America?) and potentially robbing the suspension of disbelief necessary to believe a man can fly. After seeing a genre's weak points exposed, will audiences really be excited to watch capes and costumes save the world non-stop for summers to come?"
categories Cinematical