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reviews

62
Based on 41 Reviews
critic reviews (10)
fan reviews ( 277 )
  • 88
    Peter Travers Rolling Stone

    A deeply touching human story filled with humor and heartbreak is rare in any movie season, especially summer. That's what makes The Help an exhilarating gift. show more

  • 75
    Amy Biancolli San Francisco Chronicle

    Good story, great characters, a setting plucked from history - and a multiracial, multigenerational ensemble cast stacked with fabulous actresses. But the thing that makes The Help such a rousing crowd-pleaser is its generous helping of baked goods. show more

  • 75
    Claudia Puig USA Today

    The Help sidesteps easy sentimentality. As the film's heart and soul, Davis and Spencer add vast reserves of depth and dignity to a crowd-pleasing tale. show more

  • 70
    Joe Morgenstern Wall Street Journal

    Instead of plunging us into a racist past, however, The Help takes us on a pop-cultural tour that savors the picturesque, and strengthens stereotypes it purports to shatter. show more

  • 75
    Carrie Rickey Philadelphia Inquirer

    Like its characters, it has its faults. But overall, it is a movie of imaginative sympathy that gets into the skin of its characters, into their hearts, and, ultimately, into ours. show more

  • 40
    Elizabeth Weitzman New York Daily News

    Emma Stone, for example, is no one's idea of an ugly duckling. And though she offers a sincere effort, she never quite settles into the role of Skeeter. show more

  • 60
    Kirk Honeycutt The Hollywood Reporter

    Taylor does capture the Jim Crow era and its anxieties well, but his characters tend toward the facile and his white heroine is too idealized. show more

  • 65
    Ella Taylor NPR

    Big hair, fine period frocks and interior design lend The Help a pleasingly retro look. Yet for someone who grew up in Mississippi, the director has little sense of place. show more

  • 85
    Stephanie Zacharek Movieline

    The "black maid" may be a cliché. But when was the last time we saw a story told from her point of view? show more

  • 100
    Mike Scott New Orleans Times-Picayune

    The Help isn't intended to be so much a movie about the ugliness of the era than an optimistic tale of what can spring from that kind of ugliness, about the ability of people to love one another even when they're surrounded by hatred. And on that level, The Help succeeds wonderfully, a warm and sweet song of hope. show more

  • June 11, 2012 ff00000000124807
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    A good date movie for college kids.

  • February 21, 2012 se00000000113742
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    This movie is ok. It doesn\'t deserve an OSCAR, but is good to see.

  • January 27, 2012 mmvinoski
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    Unbelievable movie about the social dynamics of that period of time. And quite a statement about the ability of a group of people to get together and make a statement. If I had a daughter, I would want her to see this film!

  • January 01, 2012 karenalden
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    I read the book before I saw the movie, both of which were excellent. The characters were true to life and the actors and actresses who played them were superb. This movie depicted injustices of the time which were cleverly exposed by courageous people. I would like to see the movie again.

  • December 26, 2011 fotoroe777
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    best movie ever!!!!!!!!!!!!!

  • November 30, 2011 ol00000000107210
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    BEST MOVIE EVER!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

  • November 27, 2011 Hope
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    Well done and tastefully funny!

  • November 04, 2011 bdolls
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    aAAAA++++++======

  • October 16, 2011 wg00000000103393
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    As New York Press’ reviewer Armond White points out the main aim of this film is to entertain, which might explain the lack of engagement with the subject matter at a level that considers the changes that have influenced discussions about race, gender and power in America since the sixties. An approach that makes for a dated film that requires the audience to ignore the most important change; that black American women no longer rely on white spokespersons to voice their concerns. Abileen’s, Minny’s and Constantin’s primary function in this film, which does little to challenge traditional racial power dynamics, and which translates black agency into steeling and black pride into frying chicken, is simply to help us distinguish good whites from bad, coward and victim whites. I might have been too distracted by the shallow treatment of the complex subject matter and the blatant stereotyping (incl. Minny delivering one Chappellesque line about chicken after the other, among them “Frying chicken just makes me feel better about life. I just love me some fried chicken”) to notice all the fun, but regardless the film would definitely have gained from more nuance and less slapstick...In response to Taylor’s dealing with The Help, nothing feels more natural than to conclude in the same non-innovative and slightly offensive manner that characterizes his take on the story: You is patronising. You is irrelevant. You is out of touch. (Full review on http://wordsofkatarina.blogspot.com/2011/10/white-girl-who-cares-abo

  • October 14, 2011 sp00000000102993
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    Loved this movie, it even got a few tears out of me

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