No one knows for sure what will happen to "The Big Bang Theory" after the show wraps its upcoming 10th season, and that includes those working both in front of and behind the camera on the hit CBS sitcom. Star Kaley Cuoco addressed the question during an appearance on "Jimmy Kimmel Live" Monday night, and while she didn't say for certain whether or not the series would sign off for good next spring, it certainly sounds like things are leaning that way.

Cuoco chatted with Kimmel about hitting the 10-season milestone, and the host asked her if season 11 had been discussed yet.

"It's a very expensive question," the actress answered, most likely referring to the huge, $1 million per episode salaries collected by the show's starring trio of Cuoco, Jim Parsons, and Johnny Galecki -- and the fact that the cast is now up for new contracts, and another potential pay raise. Cuoco laughed and joked throughout the interview, mentioning that 10 seasons' worth of "TBBT" featured a lot of hairstyle changes and evolving wardrobe choices. And she was still laughing when Kimmel asked her if 10 seasons was enough, and she said yes. But was she simply playing along, or did she mean it? Was she staying mum to avoid complications with her contract negotiations with CBS?

It's not a lot to parse, but the fact that the actress didn't come right out and say she'd love to do another season perhaps indicates that she and the rest of her castmates think it's time for the show to sign off. It's something that showrunner Steve Molaro hinted at last fall when discussing whether season 10 would be the end of the series (at the time, he thought it would), though Molaro recently told The Hollywood Reporter that he hadn't made up his mind on the issue, and was waiting for contract talks to settle before thinking about the show's future beyond the current season.

Fans will have to stay tuned. Season 10 of "The Big Bang Theory" premieres on CBS on September 19.

[h/t Screen Crush]

Photo credit: ​Michael Yarish/CBS
The Big Bang Theory
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