The Truth About Emanuel Poster

Release Date: January 10th, 2014

DVD Release Date: March 25th, 2014

Not Yet Rated|1 hr 36 min

Plot Summary
A troubled teen (Kaya Scodelario) befriends a new neighbor (Jessica Biel) who resembles the teen's late mother and is adrift in a fragile, fictional world of her own creation.

Cast: Kaya Scodelario, Jessica Biel, Frances O'Connor, Jimmi Simpson, Aneurin Barnard, Alfred Molina, Sam Jaeger, Spencer Garrett

Director: Francesca Gregorini

Genres: Drama

Production Co: MRB Productions, Rooks Nest Entertainment

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Ratings & Reviews

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  • Although Gregorini is very clear on where her lead characters are coming from, it’s where they’re headed that remains entirely vague, an oversight that leaves them unfortunately adrift. show more

  • It's highly doubtful that you'll grasp even a little of The Truth About Emanuel after seeing this film. It's not so much a thriller as it is a ride on a runaway crazy train. show more

  • In its refusal to bring an easy understanding to its main character's behavior, it comes dangerously close to presenting her as a willing perpetrator in her own victimhood. show more

  • Tautly written by Rona Segal and expertly observed by Jonathan Gurfinkel, a documentarian and TV producer who worked on the hilarious Israeli satire Eretz Nehederet, S#x Acts operates almost exclusively at the behavioral level. Suspended between titillation and despair, the movie firmly implicates us in its voyeurism. show more

  • Probably a lot of people who see this film will get fed up with Gili's passivity, but some people in life are passive in a way that feels like a defiantly inactive reaction to ill treatment. These boys don't view her as a person with feelings, but Gurfinkel's film does. show more

  • Despite some very welcome black comedy — Jimmi Simpson appears delightfully, but too briefly, as a passive-aggressive co-worker who threatens to unravel the cocoon of delusion in which Emanuel has wrapped herself — the movie, trapped in the weeds of self-pity and skin-deep badassery, never quite earns the sympathy it so strenuously solicits. show more

See all critic reviews on metacritic.com