'MacGyver' (2016) rebootPilot season is upon us -- which means viewers get a taste of the new shows coming to TV in the fall. This year's crop is especially good, with some familiar faces in new series, fresh takes on old favorites, and one new superhero show that promises to be much different than all the rest. Here are five of the hottest shows headed to your screen later this year.

'MacGyver' (CBS)

The franchise so popular its title became a verb, "MacGyver" returns to the small screen in the fall, this time following the son of the titular hero once legendary for being able to escape any situation using everyday objects. Although the tone of the show aims to be closer to "24" than the original "MacGyver," the modern-day setting will still play host to the campy trope of putting MacGyver into impossible situations and watching him escape week after week. Look for lots of action, procedural-style drama, and of course, intricate inventions that would never work in real life.

'The Great Indoors' (CBS)

After successful runs on "Community" and "Talk Soup," Joel McHale brings his trademark smarm-and-charm to "The Great Indoors," a sitcom about a celebrity outdoorsman forced to save his personal brand by managing the team behind his magazine's website. The premise allows McHale to play to his strengths -- being a middle-aged guy anchoring a cast of chaotic side characters -- while also poking fun at internet-obsessed millennials. While the laugh track and fixed sets may make "The Great Indoors" feel like a status quo sitcom, the edgy humor means it'll be anything but.

'Riverdale' (The CW)

The latest entry in The CW's long line of successful teen dramas, "Riverdale" brings the world of The Archies comics to TV in a darker, more modern context. It's actually not as crazy as it sounds. The Archie franchise has become massively popular in the last few years as the comics have taken some major chances, including forays into story lines involving zombies, and the Riverdale gang is likely to fit right in between "Gossip Girl" and "Supernatural." While the pillars of Archie comic stories will still be there (Archie will have to choose between Betty and Veronica, as always), producers promise the entire cast of characters from the comics will be around too, including fan-favorite fictional rock band Josie and the Pussycats.

'Good Place' (NBC)

"Veronica Mars" alum Kristen Bell comes back to network TV at last, with this offbeat comedy about a terrible person accidentally being let into heaven after dying. "Good Place" has a lot going for it: Producer Mike Schur (who brought us "Parks and Recreation" as well as "Brooklyn Nine-Nine") has created a world that's both silly and outrageous, and an incorrigible anti-hero we can't help but love already. Rounding out the cast is Ted Danson, once again showing off the comedic chops he honed on "Cheers" and "Bored to Death." "Good Place" looks so funny, you'll think you've died and gone to comedy heaven.

'Powerless' (NBC)

"Powerless" is a half-hour sitcom that takes place in the DC universe, but in a way we've never seen before: Emily (Vanessa Hudgens) is an insurance adjuster for the agency responsible for insuring and cleaning up after superheroes. The fast-paced comedy is a welcome addition to TV's superhero landscape, and promises a refreshing change from the heroes-and-villains motif on shows like "Arrow," "The Flash," "Legends of Tomorrow," and "Supergirl." Alan Tudyk from "Firefly" and Danny Pudi from "Community" also star, ensuring no one will question the show's geek credentials.

Sources

categories Tv News