Superhero sexuality is a hot topic these days (still rooting for you, Stucky!) and Wonder Woman/Diana Prince is now part of that discussion. Comic book writer Greg Rucka recently answered a question on the character's sexuality, and gave a thoughtful, nuanced response that got boiled down to Wonder Woman is bisexual.

Variety recently spoke with Gal Gadot, who is playing Diana in DC/Warner Bros.'s "Wonder Woman" movie, due out next June with Chris Pine as her love interest, Steve Trevor. Variety asked Gadot about the character's sexuality in the movie, and she gave her own thoughtful response:

Variety: Greg Rucka, a longtime writer of "Wonder Woman," believes the character is bisexual. He reasons that because she lived on Themyscira, which is populated solely by women, she must have had gay relationships. Is Wonder Woman bisexual in the film?

Gal Gadot: It's not something we've explored. It never came to the table, but when you talk theoretically about all the women on Themyscira and how many years she was there, then what he said makes sense. In this movie she does not experience any bisexual relationships. But it's not about that. She's a woman who loves people for who they are. She can be bisexual. She loves people for their hearts.

She loves people for their hearts. It's not a bad place to start.


In terms of how we got to Wonder Woman as bisexual, the topic came up when Greg Rucka talked to Matt Santori-Griffith of Comicosity. Here's a portion of their lengthy Q&A:

Matt Santori-Griffith: I'm going to start off simple and to the point. The Wonder Woman that you and Nicola [Scott] have introduced to us in "Year One" — is she queer?

Greg Rucka: How are we defining "queer?"

You're applying a term specifically and talking to an ostensibly cis male (and white to boot), so "queer" to me may not be the same as it is to an out gay man. So, tell me what queer is.

MSG: Fair enough. For the purposes of this conversation, I would define "queer" as involving, although not necessarily exclusively, romantic and/or sexual interest toward persons of the same gender. It's not the full definition, but it's the part I'm narrowing in on here.

GR: Then, yes.

I think it's more complicated though. This is inherently the problem with Diana: we've had a long history of people — for a variety of reasons, including sometimes pure titillation, which I think is the worst reason — say, "Ooo. Look. It's the Amazons. They're gay!"

And when you start to think about giving the concept of Themyscira its due, the answer is, "How can they not all be in same sex relationships?" Right? It makes no logical sense otherwise.

It's supposed to be paradise. You're supposed to be able to live happily. You're supposed to be able — in a context where one can live happily, and part of what an individual needs for that happiness is to have a partner — to have a fulfilling, romantic and sexual relationship. And the only options are women.

But an Amazon doesn't look at another Amazon and say, "You're gay." They don't. The concept doesn't exist.

Now, are we saying Diana has been in love and had relationships with other women? As Nicola and I approach it, the answer is obviously yes.

And it needs to be yes for a number of reasons. But perhaps foremost among them is, if no, then she leaves paradise only because of a potential romantic relationship with Steve [Trevor]. And that diminishes her character. It would hurt the character and take away her heroism.

Read more of his response and the full interview. "Wonder Woman," directed by Patty Jenkins, will be released in theaters June 2, 2017.

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Wonder Woman
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In Theaters on June 2nd, 2017

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