Stephen King wonders why fans are talking so much about "that single sex scene" in his novel "IT" as opposed to discussing the "multiple child murders." The topic is coming up again since the first "IT" movie just hit theaters (and made a ton of money) minus that infamous gang-bang scene.

In the 1986 book, the Losers Club kids are 11-years-old. There are six boys and one girl. Toward the end of the novel, King wrote a scene where the girl Beverly (abused by her father at home) decides to have sex with each boy. It's not even a departure for King; he's no stranger to creepy sex/molestation/child abuse/rape storylines in his books. That's just something you have to get used to with Uncle Stevie.

On his website in 2013, King posted a statement on the scene:

"I wasn't really thinking of the sexual aspect of it. The book dealt with childhood and adulthood –1958 and Grown Ups. The grown ups don't remember their childhood. None of us remember what we did as children–we think we do, but we don't remember it as it really happened. Intuitively, the Losers knew they had to be together again. The sexual act connected childhood and adulthood. It's another version of the glass tunnel that connects the children's library and the adult library. Times have changed since I wrote that scene and there is now more sensitivity to those issues."

There wasn't more sensitivity to child gang-bangs before 1986? OK.

Entertainment Weekly and other sites recently posted on the "IT" orgy scene and how the film handled it, referencing King's statement. Vulture reached out to King himself, to confirm that statement was legit and represented his thoughts on the matter.

His response asked its own questions:

"That sounds like my statement. To it I'd just add that it's fascinating to me that there has been so much comment about that single sex scene and so little about the multiple child murders. That must mean something, but I'm not sure what."

Well, the child murders are acknowledged as wrong -- evil and frightening and the main focus of the horror novel. The "sex scene" is an out-of-left-field addition, as opposed to being acknowledged as, well, wrong. As a grown man slipping in a random scene where an 11-year-old girl is passed around her male friends. But, like everything, the scene is open to interpretation.

The movie does not include the scene, and it's already cleaning up at the box office. A sequel, "Chapter Two," is preparing to film next year.

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It Movie Poster
It
R2017
Based on 48 critics

Seven young outcasts in Derry, Maine, are about to face their worst nightmare -- an ancient, shape-shifting... Read More

September 26, 2017
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categories Movies