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reviews

76
Based on 20 Reviews
critic reviews (10)
fan reviews ( )
  • 75
    Walter Addiego San Francisco Chronicle

    This new picture is mainly in the spirit of fun, a loose, generally good-natured comedy with screwball overtones. show more

  • 80
    Joe Morgenstern Wall Street Journal

    Who knew this German-born Turkish filmmaker could perpetrate a delirious farce-in German and Greek with good English subtitles-that doesn't flag for a single one of its 99 minutes? show more

  • 75
    Steven Rea Philadelphia Inquirer

    Zany screwball farce. show more

  • 70
    Ray Bennett The Hollywood Reporter

    In a fine ensemble with many well-drawn smaller characters, Bleibtreu ("Run Lola Run", "The Baader-Meinhof Complex") as the hapless brother, Unel ("Head On") as the fussy chef and Bederke, as a waitress, all stand out. show more

  • 70
    Jeannette Catsoulis NPR

    Turkish-German filmmaker Fatih Akin isn't exactly known for slapstick, so Soul Kitchen has the feel of a palate cleanser. After the hard-edged drama of "Head-On" and "The Edge of Heaven," this boisterous comedy milling with scruffy misfits goes down more easily than an oyster on the half shell. show more

  • 85
    Stephanie Zacharek Movieline

    This is a picture whose dance steps are determined by any number of mishaps and misfortunes; like the dance floor of a great club on a good night, it's gorgeous, unruly and exhilarating all at once. show more

  • 75
    Michael Phillips Chicago Tribune

    The funky, enjoyable Hamburg-set comedy Soul Kitchen is a celebration of co-writer-director Fatih Akin's home base, a spacious, moody city of apparently limitless industrial warehouse space - like Chicago. show more

  • 75
    Wesley Morris Boston Globe

    This is a party, and you're either having a good time or wondering when Akin is going to get down to business. But for an hour and a half, fun is the business. show more

  • 63
    James Berardinelli ReelViews

    The only reason Soul Kitchen is being marketed as an "art film" in the United States is because it is subtitled. On merit, this is as mainstream as one can imagine - a generic, feel-good plot that's fit for a sit-com. Call it My Big Fat Greek Restaurant. show more

  • 50
    V.A. Musetto New York Post

    There are moments of fun (an aphrodisiac-laced dessert, for example), but generally the humor seems warmed-over. show more

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