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PG-13| 1 hr. 57 min.

Plot Summary
After serving 15 years in prison for killing her young son, Juliette (Kristin Scott Thomas) moves in with her younger sister, Lea (Elsa Zylberstein). Though Lea has built a comfortable family life in the years since Juliette went away, she is still affected by her sister's terrible crime. Meanwhile, world-weary Juliette attempts to get past the years of estrangement and reconnect with Lea.

Cast: Kristin Scott Thomas , Elsa Zylberstein , Serge Hazanavicius , Laurent Grévill , Frédéric Pierrot , Lise Ségur , Jean-Claude Arnaud , Mouss Zouheyri

Director: Philippe Claudel

Genres: Drama

Distributor: Sony Pictures Classics

I've Loved You So Long (2008)

Release Date: October 24th, 2008|1 hr. 57 min.

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critic reviews (10)
fan reviews ( 4 )
  • 100
    Mick LaSalle San Francisco Chronicle

    Kristin Scott Thomas' performance in I've Loved You So Long is one of a small handful of highlights by which people will remember this year in movies. This is acting at its most exalted. show more

  • 75
    Claudia Puig USA Today

    Writer/director Philippe Claudel knows just how to structure a character study of this sort, so that key elements and important secrets are revealed over time, piquing our interest. The film is almost like a novel or short story, so one's curiosity is satisfied slowly. show more

  • 90
    Joe Morgenstern Wall Street Journal

    Philippe Claudel gives his heroine unusual depth, which Kristin Scott Thomas reveals with unusual passion. show more

  • January 25, 2009 lizajelli
    Report This User

    It's odd to me that people seem to be missing what I believe is a critical point about the obese person in the film. Maybe you had to stay to the end of the film to realize it, but the obese person, the war refugees, the stroke victim -- these are all very important to the essence of the film's message. KST's character could not forgive herself for bringing a child into the world who got sick. Her inability to accept this "imperfection" is what led her to such a tragic act. In my reading, the film is intentionally filled with people who have, at one time or another, been considered less than fully human by society. And yet they are living fully engaged lives, loved and accepted by the people around them as they are. It is this acceptance of those all around her -- and the loving acceptance she receives from her sister -- that finally gets through to Juliette. That and --spoiler alert-- the fact that the policeman kills himself. I think at that point she sees two choices and goes for the hopeful, accepting one.

  • January 14, 2009 PEPPERFLOWER8
    Report This User

    Opps for forgot my rating, 5 stars!

  • December 08, 2008 Placebo718
    Report This User

    I normally do not write movie reviews, however, this was an exceptional film. To say that it was anything less than poignant and deeply emotional, as well as well-written and extremely well-acted is to insult the entire art. That said, I feel the need to respond to some of the previous reviewer's statements. FIrst, there is a single 'obese' person in the film. She is in one (two if I'm mistaken) scenes. Furthermore, there is no agenda here promoting obesity. There is only two or three scenes in which food is even present. The characters smoke and drink coffee constantly, which, last time I checked, does not a fatty make. Second, the child's acting is superb. However, we no longer use the term oriental as it is incredibly offensive.

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